Latest Event Updates

Optimism on Thanksgiving? Compare the Washington Post and Washington Times

Posted on Updated on

The Thanksgiving 2015 editions of both the Washington Post and the Washington Times covered some of the same traditional territory that all national papers seem inclined to cover.  Two examples are Obama’s turkey pardoning and holiday traveling.  Beyond that though, there’s a glaring difference in the tone and content of each paper’s coverage of this uniquely American holiday.

Below are the Thanksgiving-related articles from 11/26/15.  A few more in the Times than the Post, which might not be startling.  But in addition to having more content, there’s a decidedly brighter tone to the Times’ articles as a whole.  Each Thanksgiving article listed in this table is highlighted in green if it had a positive, optimistic or heartwarming emphasis.  It’s clear at a glance that the Times provided its readers with words of encouragement far beyond those of the Post.  Also of note is the size difference in both papers; 54 pages vs 26.

In 54 pages the Post put a positive touch to only four of its articles related to Thanksgiving.  Over three times the number of articles in the Times were positive (13) in a paper that was less than half the size. 

Post Times Table

All of this may be of no interest, but clearly one paper lives by the motto that “bad news sells” and hence not much room left for positive and uplifting content.  If you want positive, you can always check out the Post’s  horoscopes.

Advertisements

Thanksgiving, a time for …. politics?

Posted on Updated on

 

ThanksgivingOur fearless leader suggested we spend a little quality time this Thanksgiving mixing politics in with our turkey and fixin’s.  Nothing says love, togetherness, and holidays more than a heated discussion over gun control.  Isn’t he satisfied enough with tearing the country apart that he doesn’t need to have families fighting as well?

Obama attempt at calm?

Posted on Updated on

Afraid

Obama isn’t exactly inspiring confidence.  Even listening to his rambling you’d think it was a middle schooler trying to convince classmates that he’s the right man for class presidency, complete with plenty of “ums and uhs” to fully sell his commitment.   Middle school students basically just wanted free stuff so maybe that’s his target audience, or democrats.  Although, we’re sure there’s an army of unicorns just around the corner that Obama’s preparing to unleash on the unsuspecting bad-guys-with-good-media-skills ISIS.

Liberals and their prayers

Image Posted on Updated on

Algebra test

CNN, with careful editing, helps us focus on their version of Trump’s message

Posted on Updated on

CNN is helping us all with time management by clipping out context from interviews.  Check out how CNN edited Donald Trump’s statements during an “interview” with an NBC reporter.  Why waist valuable video time leaving in material that could place context on what a candidate is discussing, especially when it doesn’t fit your agenda (sarcasm).

Here’s how the video came across originally on CNN.

Reporter: Should there be a database that tracks Muslims entering this country?

Trump: There should be a lot of systems, beyond databases. We should have a lot of systems, and today you can do it.

Reporter: Is that something your White House would like to implement?

Trump: I would certainly implement that. Absolutely.

CNN Video of Trump’s Comments

Now for that oh-so-unnecessary video portion that provides context in bold.

Reporter: Should there be a database that tracks Muslims entering this country?

Trump: There should be a lot of systems, beyond databases. We should have a lot of systems, and today you can do it. But right now we need to have a border, we have to have strength we have to have a wall, and we cannot let what’s happening to this country happen any longer.

Reporter: Is that something your White House would like to implement?

Trump: I would certainly implement that. Absolutely.

Shame on CNN for editing, shame on NBC for deploying gotcha questions, and also shame on Trump for not listening carefully to the question.

 

A cure for all social ills from the Washington Post

Posted on Updated on

Thanks to the latest Washington Post Arts and Style section (Sunday 11/22/15), there’s a sure fire way to treat all social ills that occur within our racist, sexist, climate denier and islamaphobic America. We’ve conveniently hit the high spots below so you can quickly determine which books are for you based on your unhinged inner turmoil that either needs to be corrected if you’re a racist, sexist, etc. or enhanced if you don’t feel guilty enough. In some cases we’ve included snippets of their mini-summaries, let’s call them micro-summaries, so you can target your own individual needs.

This is just a subset of the many books the Washington Post highlighted covering a wide range of topics. We don’t doubt that many of those we’ve listed deserves high praise. But as a collection it’s an overwhelming showcase of a liberal agenda.

Arms: The Culture and Credo of Guns “…gun owners, along with their culture and rhetoric, ‘have grown more radical’ leaving ‘anyone who breaks ranks’ as a ‘traitor to the cause.’”

Stoned: A Doctor’s Case for Medical Marijuana

Application for Release from the Dream “…the voice is witheringly clear-sighted about contemporary American life. The poems address large-scale topics – financial inequities, consumerism – …”

The Emperor of Water Clocks “A rich, multilayered book that combines threads of fable, literature, music and cultural references… Other poems – about tensions in the street after Ferguson and President Obama reading works of Derek Walcott … ground readers in the present.”

ISIS: The State of Terror “It paints a picture of the Islamic State … but does not portray ISIS as ‘an existential threat to any Western country.’”

Give us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America “…the struggle to pass the Voting Rights Act … and the ongoing effort to strip the act of its power.”

March: Book Two “This twinning assault on the senses drives home the toll of the sacrifices that should inform today’s protesters, from Black Lives Matter to the University of Missouri.”

The Gay Revolution: The Story of the Struggle

Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America “It’s no secret that America has a problem with black-on-black violence but what Leovy understands is why.”

Purity “Pip accepts an internship with a rogue Web site in the jungles of Bolivia that exposes the nasty secrets of corporations and nations.”

Welcome to Braggsville “D’aron and three friends travel back to Braggsville and stage a mock lynching, “a performance intervention.”

Between the World and Me “… is a riveting meditation on the state of race in America that has arrive at a tumultuous moment in the nation’s history of racial strife.”

Showdown: Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court Nomination that Changed America

Negroland “… is not about raw racism … it is about subtleties and nuances, presumptions and slights that chip away at one’s humanity and take a mental toll.”

The Nuns of Sant’Ambrogio: The True Story of Convent in Scandal “Sister Maria Luisa was intelligent, charismatic and beautiful. She was also a rapist, embezzler, murderer – and, when her crimes came to light in 1858, a serious threat to the Vatican.”

The Only Woman in the Room: Why Science is Still a Boys’ Club

The Pentagon’s Brain: An Uncensored History of DARPA, America’s Top-Secret Military Research Agency “… sometimes uneasy exploration of DARPA, the high-tech incubator responsible for … the research behind harsh interrogation techniques …”

The Dying Grass: A Novel of the Nez Perce War “… an American tragedy with all the unforgiving climates of our nation.”

Town, a Civil Rights Battle

Golden Age “… the story of the transformation of white middle America … how they witness the imminent destruction of the planet.”

The Unfortunates “… a brilliant social satire of life among the 1 percent of the 1 percent.” “A trenchant vision of American aristocracy.”

Sisters in Law: How Sandra Day O’Connor and Ruther Bader Ginsburg Went to the Supreme Court and Changed the World